What Is Anchored Grip in Golf?

An anchored grip in golf involves securing the putter against a part of your body, typically the chest or the forearm, to reduce hand and wrist movement during the putting stroke. This technique was once popular but has been restricted by golf’s governing bodies due to its potential to provide an unfair advantage.

In the past, golfers used anchored grips as a means of improving stability and reducing the “yips,” which are involuntary tremors or jerky movements that can affect putting accuracy. The most common anchored grip was the belly putter, where the grip end rested against the golfer’s belly, and the long putter, where it was anchored to the chest or chin.

However, in 2016, the USGA (United States Golf Association) and R&A (The R&A, which oversees golf worldwide except in the United States and Mexico) implemented a rule change that restricts the use of anchored grips in competitive play. This rule change aimed to preserve the traditional method of putting and prevent golfers from gaining an unfair advantage through anchoring.

While anchored grips are no longer allowed in competitive golf, recreational golfers may still choose to use them for practice or casual rounds. It’s important to note that the ban only applies to putting strokes, and the use of anchored grips for other types of shots, such as full swings, is still permissible.

In summary, an anchored grip in golf involves securing the putter against a part of the body to reduce hand and wrist movement during the putting stroke. However, it has been restricted in competitive play by golf’s governing bodies to maintain the integrity of the game.


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